Posted 3 months ago
Posted 1 year ago
Posted 1 year ago

Top 10 list of film characters that scare me (in the good way and the bad)

10. The flesh eaters from 28 Days Later who could run after their victims. Wicked!
9. Patrick Bateman, the Wall Street butcher from American Psycho. The book was better than the movie.
8. What’s worse than white collar serial killers? The foppish bloodsuckers from Interview With A Vampire. I guess that’s where it all started.
7. The giant spiders from Eight-Legged Freaks. Not scary in the good way.
6. The rattler from Rango had a sixgun for a tail. That’s cool and all, but the toddlers who saw that in the theaters must’ve soiled themselves.
5. No Face from Spirited Away. Misunderstood creature but creepy as hell.
4. Tahwaan from the Thai horror movie Sick Nurses. I won’t spoil the climax, but she was a breed apart from other vengeful Asian ghosts. Really wicked!
3. Lady Wakasa from the Japanese classic Ugetsu. Seduction from beyond the grave.
2. John Doe from Se7en. One ambitious human has more destructive power than any movie monster.
1. Carrie. To me, this was raw horror. Not that Friday the 13th stuff. Her humiliation and frustration led to the massacre at the prom. Everybody – the guilty and the innocent – paid for it. That poster gives me the creeps.

Enjoy your Halloween…

Posted 1 year ago

1 versus 300

I love being an indie writer and e-publisher. But being an online marketer? Uhh…

I don’t nag friends and family into writing reviews for my ebooks. And unlike a handful of e-novelists who paid a service to give them 300 positive customer reviews on online bookstores, I think that’s dishonest.

I want an honest review from somebody who bought the ebook and actually read it. Pass or fail; good or bad; the truth is the truth. So when I received this review for my latest novella Yuurei, it meant a lot!

I don’t know who the reviewer is, but I’m glad Hoodooboo understood where I was coming from. She got it.

P.S. Hoodooboo, I’m trying to break down the next Yuurei story. It pits Randa against the manifestation of a cursed otome game. ;D

Posted 1 year ago

"Kanaiwa kumamaiwa o’u pilikia aka ‘a’ohe o’u he kauwa."

Translated from Hawaiian: “I got 99 problems but…” You know the rest.

Posted 1 year ago

Welina mai Hawai’i.

Posted 1 year ago
Posted 1 year ago

Duke Kahanamoku of the U.S. Swimming Team receiving the gold medal for the 100-meter freestyle at the 1912 Olympics in Stockholm, Sweden.

Posted 1 year ago
An educated person is one who has finally discovered that there are some questions to which nobody has the answer.
Posted 1 year ago

Postcard from the Waikiki of yesteryear.

Posted 1 year ago
They train ninja very young at Mie Castle.

They train ninja very young at Mie Castle.

Posted 1 year ago

Misfits don’t start out that way. YUUREI - a coming-of-age revenge thriller.

Posted 1 year ago
I used to think it was awful that life was unfair. Then I thought ‘Wouldn’t it be much worse if life were fair and all the terrible things that happen to us come because we actually deserve them?’ So now I take great comfort in the general hostility and unfairness of the universe.
J. Michael Straczynski
Posted 1 year ago

Because protecting its story from oblivion matters: Ka Hae Hawai’i (the Hawaiian Flag) was created by King Kamehameha the Great as the symbol of the eight islands united as a Nation under one rule.

People see its design as a combination of two flags. Not true. It’s a combination of four. The Union Jack and the eight stripes represent the United Kingdom and the United States. The red, white and blue in the stripes signify the flags of France and Russia. It was both a gesture of friendship and a stern warning by Kamehameha to the naval powers of that era.

Why? Those countries were going to divide the islands amongst themselves. Russia wanted Kaua’i (Tsarist Russia built a fort in Waimea and two more in Hanalei); France wanted Maui (La Pérouse Bay on the south shore was named after the explorer who was also a French aristocrat); and Captain James Cook of Great Britain was killed on the Big Island (payback, anyone?).

Kamehameha’s strategy of unification lasted for seven decades after his death. So consider what could have happened: Hawai’i split into four protectorates like post-World War II Germany.

There is history. And then, there is memory. I didn’t read this in a book. It was shared with me. I’m sharing it with you. Because the story isn’t over and the future belongs to you.

I wear this pin when I have to get in a suit and tie. But this is the way I see it: anybody who truly loves the islands can fly that flag.

Posted 1 year ago

The human skeleton in all its glory. With the names of the principal bones in Hawaiian and English. If you get these words tattooed on you, send me the link to those photos.

He mea iki. (Trans: You’re welcome.)